Ancient City That Predates The Pyramids

A 7,000-year-old city, predating both the Pharaohs and Pyramids has been discovered in Egypt.

A group of French and Egyptian archaeologists has made another surprising discovery in Egypt, as they have excavated the remains of one of the oldest settlements in the world, dating back to the Neolithic period.

The Ministry of Antiquities also announced that this finding “offers a unique opportunity to shed light on the prehistoric communities that lived in the Nile Delta before the reign of the first Pharaonic dynasty.”

The Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities released a statement saying that archaeologist had excavated silos contain extensive amounts of animal remains as well as planets, pottery and stone tools, in the fertile lands of Tell el Samara, located in Dacalia, some 140 kilometers north of Cairo.

The settlement dates back to around 5,000 BCE, which means that it effectively predates the construction of the famous pyramids at Giza by at least 2,500 years.

According to experts, the village’s agriculture heavily depended on rain. This discovery may help experts understand the development of the agriculture based on the irrigation system used by the ancient inhabitants of the Nile delta.

Dr. Nadia Khedr, a ministry official responsible for Egyptian, Greek, and Roman antiquities on the Mediterranean coast, explained how rain-based plantations at the time may have given ‘early Egyptians’ the ability to start large-scale irrigation farming.

“Analyzing the biological material that has been discovered will present us with a clearer view of the first communities that settled in the Delta and the origins of agriculture and farming in Egypt,” she said.

Lately, Egypt has become a hot zone for archeological discoveries.

Not long ago we reported about the discovery of ‘a second Sphinx’ which was found at Luxor, located several meters beneath the surface.

Furthermore, not long ago, another group of archaeologists discovered what is now considered the oldest cheese in the world in the tomb of Ptahmes, mayor of the ancient city of Memphis, according to a study published in the journal Analytical Chemistry of the American Chemical Society.

Also, a sensational discovery was made when construction workers discovered a massive Granite Sarcophagus in Alexandria. At the time, some experts even thought that the massive unopened granite Sarcophagus may be the resting place of Alexander the Great. However, after the ancient tomb was opened, experts revealed that it was filled with the skeletal remains of three individuals who were most likely soldiers. The tomb was found to date back to the Ptolemaic period between 305 B.C. and 30 B.C.

In addition to all of the above, archaeologists excavating in Southern Egypt has recovered an extremely rare marble head which is believed to depict the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

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